Posted tagged ‘holidays’

Blog Post 209 – Gunpowder

July 3, 2018

It’s hard to miss the sounds of constant explosions overhead near a number of U.S. cities during the first week of July. The Independence Day celebrations are loud, full of the sounds of wailing guitars at outdoor concerts, screams at amusement parks, and of course, the smoky shrieks and bangs of fireworks overhead. Canada Day, celebrated July 1st, is also a reason to break out the big bangs and send rockets into the sky. The substance fueling much of the fun at these celebrations is gunpowder. A volatile but useful blend of potassium nitrate (or “saltpeter”), charcoal, and sulphur, gunpowder was first developed by the Chinese in the Sung Dynasty over a thousand years ago, when rulers quickly found celebratory and military applications for the new alchemical mixture.

 

While incredibly dangerous in the wrong hands, gunpowder has also become a ubiquitous part of human life for better or worse, and that includes in the realms of folk magic. Today I’m sharing a few examples of the way that folk magicians in North America have found uses for gunpowder that rely upon its explosive properties to create uncanny results. A NOTE: Please do not take anything in this post as advice. Messing with gunpowder is, as already stated, DANGEROUS. Everything presented here is offered as folklore and history, and not as any sort of endorsement of the behavior described.

 

So how have practitioners historically put gunpowder to use? As you might have guessed, the destructive qualities of black powder have been a major part of its magical applications. According to several variations of folk spells in the regions running from the northern Appalachian Mountains down into the Gulf of Mexico delta and a bit west of the Mississippi, it has several uses. Gunpowder combined with lodestone and red pepper can be turned into a mojo that will increase business. Added to foods, it also has the power to increase potency, as one hoodoo recommendation involves feeding gunpowder to a guard dog to make him vicious (DON’T DO THIS). One Pennsylvania pow-wow remedy for treating urinary disease in horses involves mixing gunpowder with flour, gentian, and calamus and feeding it to the animal until the disease clears. Perhaps one of the most surprising applications is in the area of women’s reproductive health, where gunpowder was once believed to stimulate expulsive contractions, with results varying depending on when the woman used the remedy. Harry M. Hyatt found that gunpowder was used as an abortifacient to induce miscarriage in Adams County, Illinois, including a topical remedy that required a woman to rub her breasts with it every night until the desired outcome occurred. A belief from the mountainous area of eastern Kentucky says that a small dose of gunpowder given right before birth will help to ease the labor, as well.

 

Most hoodoo and Southern conjure-based magical applications incorporate the magical properties of the particular ingredients, especially the bad luck-breaking power of sulphur, as a component of the spell. Mixed with ingredients like salt and sugar, it can be turned into bathing scrubs that take off negative effects in hurry. In some cases, only the ingredients (usually sulphur but sometimes saltpeter as well) would be added to a bath, and in other accounts, gunpowder itself would be added to other components to actively destroy the harmful effects of a curse, as in this example from Hyatt’s five-volume collection of (mostly) African American magical practices [dialect left mostly intact from Hyatt’s transcriptions]:

Mah husband , he wus witchcraft heah a little before Christmas , an’ when he begin , he begin as a chills-an’ fevah. An’ course I didn’t know, you know, right then…an’ I had [the] doctor…They say he had the flu. An’ so he wusn’t whut you call real, you know, sick like a medical doctor [says], you know. The medicine he give ‘im—he give ‘im medicine an’ it didn’t seem to do him no good. So his mind led’ im that he knew it wusn’t pure sickness. So I had my fortune told an’ it…wusn’t pure natural.  So they fixed ‘im—a root doctor fixed him some medicine. An’ it holp him, too; but you see, jis’ like they put [something] down for yah, all the medicine you take it won’t cure you. So I had someone to come to pick it [an object she found] up. I don’t know exac’ly wut it wus, but it was down under the—kin’a in the south part of the house an’ right in the middle, jis’ like you walk over it. An’ this filth, of course you have to step in it. An’ they [the root doctor] taken it up, an’ after takin’ it up, you know, they kill it. They kill it with salt. An’ then I had to—after takin’ it up they put salt on it, wash it off, an’ put it in a paper an’ let it dry. Then I had to take it an’ put lye, an’ sulphur, red pepper, an’ gunpowder, put it in a quart up an’ put a quart of water in it an’ boil it [every] bit of the water out it, right dry, an’ then take an’ [carry] it to a runn’ water an’, you know, put it in. That’s called, that’s turnin’ back on the one that did it.

One of the best (and most explosive applications) involves mixing gunpowder and other ingredients with an enemy’s footprint, then lighting the mixture on fire and watching it explode. This supposedly causes them to leave town in a hurry (possibly due to the strange explosions they keep hearing). Because it contains sulphur, variations on the hexing compound known as “Goopher Dust” can also have gunpowder mixed in. Mixed with other repelling herbs like asafetida the gunpowder could be worn in shoes or carried in a pouch around a person’s neck to ward off harm. Jason Miller’s Protection and Reversal Magick mentions a “jinx-breaker” mojo bag a person can carry which has sulpher and saltpeter (and thus everything but the charcoal in gunpowder) as well as lemongrass. Miller doesn’t specifically mention using gunpowder, but it is likely that some extant variations of the hand would use it as a necessary substitution.

Of course, gunpowder’s application in celebrations can also have a magical or spiritual significance. Spinning fire-wheels powered by gunpowder fireworks are often used in ceremonies honoring the dead or unseen spirits. The Urglaawe Heathen tradition uses such a “Catherine Wheel” in its Sunneraad (Yuletide) celebrations, and similar wheels can be found in Mexican Dia de los Muertos festivities. Similarly, many Appalachian people would celebrate the arrival of the New Year by “shooting in” the day with live ammunition fired into the air, which was also thought to induce good luck or scare away bad luck. Shooting in also happened in cities, where it could pose a significant safety threat, and often those not directly participating would sequester themselves indoors to avoid the “Calithumpian” revelries which also included costumes, masks, and a lot of heavy drinking. In some Vodoun rituals, celebrants may make the veve designs of a particular loa out of gunpowder, especially if that loa is “hot” in nature, such as the Petro spirits. In other cases, gunpowder may be specifically avoided to prevent inciting spirits to become destructive or to avoid any potential spiritual insults.

 

Gunpower was also sometimes employed to spark a sudden or rapid change in less personal conditions as well, for example in weather magic. In American Folklore: An Encyclopedia, the author notes that out in the frequently dry prairie areas of North America such as Nebraska and Kansas, “professional ‘rainmakers’ sought to earn their pay by firing explosions from balloons, building large, smoky fires, or setting off gunpowder explosions from high peaks” during the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.

 

In most cases, the essential magical nature of gunpowder is driven by one of two factors: its ability to explode on ignition or its ingredients’ magical properties. Many applications, such as the jinx-breaking in the hoodoo examples, rely on a mixture of both aspects: a symbolic rapid change and the physical presence or properties of the sulphur and saltpeter (the charcoal seldom gets a mention, but its “neutralizing” nature seems to be a good fit, too). The abortifacient uses of gunpowder also could be an extension of these characteristics. One of the most interesting things about gunpowder is its relative predicatibility for an explosive substance (as opposed to say, nitroglycerin, which can be incredibly volatile). Gunpowder is even used to create artworks in seriously cool ways because it can be controlled. At the same time, this substance continues to be dangerous, causing more than a few lost digits or limbs every year during July celebrations and fueling firearms that can do immense damage to life and property. In some ways, gunpowder is almost a perfect metaphor for folk magic more generally—deployed with intention and thought, it can do wonderful things, but carelessly handled it can cause irreparable harm.

 

So as the fireworks are booming overhead during this first week of July in North America, I hope you will look up at the bright and beautiful patterns and think about some of the magic in them that goes beyond the visual awe and glamor. Although, if you prefer to “ooh” and “aah” at them instead, I can hardly blame you.

 

Thanks for reading!

-Cory

 

References and Further Reading

  1. Brunvand, Jan, ed. American Folklore: An Encyclopedia. New York: Garland Press, 1996.
  2. Davis, Susan G. Parades and Power: Street Theatre in Nineteenth Century Pennsylvania. Philadelphia: Temple Univ. Press, 1986.
  3. Corbett, Bob. “Eshin-Fun Answers: African Religion Syncretism.” Webster University Website (http://faculty.webster.edu/corbetre/haiti/voodoo/syncretism.htm).
  4. Hohman, John George, and Daniel Harms, ed. The Long-Lost Friend: A 19th-Century American Grimoire, Llewellyn, 2012.
  5. Hyatt, Harry M. The Folklore of Adams County, Illinois. New York: Alma Egan Hyatt Foundation, 1935.
  6. —. Hoodoo, Conjuration, Witchcraft, Rootwork (5 Vols.). New York: Alma Egan Hyatt Foundation, 1970.
  7. Miller, Jason. Protection and Reversal Magick. Franklin Lakes, NJ: New Page Books, 2006.
  8. Milnes, Gerald C. Signs, Cures, & Witchery. Knoxville, Univ. of Tennessee Press, 2007.
  9. Randolph, Vance. Ozark Magic and Folklore. Dover Publications, 1964.
  10. Schreiwer, Robert L. “Yuletide Sunneraad 2017.” Urglaawe: Deitsch-Pennsylvania German Heathenry Website. (http://urglaawe.blogspot.com/2017/12/yuletide-sunneraad-2017.html).
  11. Thomas, Daniel, and Lindsey Thomas. Kentucky Superstitions. Charleston, SC: Nabu Press, 2012 (reprint).
  12. yronwode, catherine. Hoodoo Herb and Root Magic. Forestville, CA: Lucky Mojo Curio Co., 2002.
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Episode 120 – Yuletide Cheer! 2017

December 21, 2017

Summary:

In our Yuletide episode, we listen to carols (and of course some wassails), hear a story about an ember-eating ancient creature, and share listener greetings for the season.

 

Please check out our Patreon page! You can help support the show for as little as a dollar a month, and get some awesome rewards at the same time.  Even if you can’t give, spread the word and let others know, and maybe we can make New World Witchery even better than it is now.

 

Producers for this show: Heather, Jenna, Achija of Spellbound Bookbinding, Corvus, Khristopher, Ye Olde Magic Shoppe, Raven Dark Moon, Little Wren, J.C., Mandy, Josette, Jen Rue of Rue & Hyssop, Catherine, AthenaBeth, Cynara at The Auburn Skye, Victoria, Johnathan at the ModernSouthernPolytheist, Montine, Regina, Hazel, Michael, Patrick, & Sherry (if we missed you this episode, we’ll make sure you’re in the next one!). Big thanks to everyone supporting us!

Play:

Download: Episode 120 – Yuletide Cheer! 2017

Play: 

 -Sources-

See “Promos & Music” for a complete track listing.

Special thanks this episode to listeners Achija, AthenaBeth, the young ladies who called in to ask about Krampus, and everyone else who wished us a happy season.

Special thanks as well to the luminous Sylvia V. Linsteadt for sharing a selection from her book, Tatterdemalion, with us during this episode. You can find out more about that book and the artwork of the equally luminous Rima Staines at Hedgespoken.

If you have feedback you’d like to share, email us or leave a comment. We’d love to hear from you!

Don’t forget to follow us at Twitter! And check out our Facebook page! For those who are interested, we also now have a page on Pinterest you might like, called “The Olde Broom.” Have something you want to say? Leave us a voice mail on our official NWW hotline: (442) 999-4824 (that’s 442-99-WITCH, if it helps).

 

 Promos & Music

Playlist:

 

  1. Christmas Rhyme – Ewan MacCarroll (LOC/Lomax Collection)
  2. Apple Tree Wassail – Shira Kammen (Magnatune)
  3. Old Chistmas – Boyd Asher ((LOC/Lomax Collection)
  4. The Night Before Christmas – Harry E. Humphrey (Free Music Archive)
  5. What Cheer to a Ground – Quire Cleveland (Magnatune)
  6. Pan Hospordaryu – Ukranian Village Voice (Free Music Archive)
  7. Good King Wenceslas – Maya Solovy (Free Music Archive)
  8. Shchedrik – Kitka (Magnatune)
  9. The Holly & the Ivy – Quire Cleveland (Magnatune)
  10. Bring a Torch, Jeanette, Isabella – Aaron DeVries (Free Music Archive)
  11. Bring Us in Good Ale – Shira Kammen (Magnatune)
  12. Pat-a-Pan – Steve Eulberg (Magnatune)
  13. Un Enfant Vien De Nuit – Modestus Eugene and the Trinidad and Tobago Singers (LOC/Lomax Collection)
  14. White Christmas – Marigolds Scratch Band (LOC/Lomax Collection)
  15. O Day – Georgia Sea Island Singers (LOC/Lomax Collection)
  16. Song for a Winter’s Night – The Nancies (Free Music Archive)
  17. Solstice Night – J. Tucker (with Artist Permission)
  18. In the Bleak Midwinter – Maya Solovy (Free Music Archive)
  19. “Da Day Dawn,” Samantha Gillogly (With Artist Permission)

 

 Incidental Music: “The Glory of the Kitchen” (Passamezzo – Magnatune); Seth Partridge – Sing We Now of Christmas (Free Music Archive); “Stille Nacht” (Ralph Rousseau Meulenbroeks – Magnatune); “Winter’s Ritual” and “Treachery is Afoot” (S.J. Tucker); “Constellations,” “Aurora Borealis,” and “Celestial Sphere” (Robert Otto – Magnatune); “Ceremonies for a Christmas Eve – Passamezzo (Magnatune)”

Episode 104 – Yuletide Fear! 2016

December 21, 2016
Masked Figure at Krampuslauf Philadelphia 2015 (photo by M. Sellers)

Masked Figure at Krampuslauf Philadelphia 2015 (photo by M. Sellers)

Summary:

This episode explores the dark side of the winter holiday season, with a pair of scary ghost stories and an interview with Krampus expert Al Ridenour.

 

Please check out our Patreon page! You can help support the show for as little as a dollar a month, and get some awesome rewards at the same time.  Even if you can’t give, spread the word and let others know, and maybe we can make New World Witchery even better than it is now.

 

Producers for this show: Corvus, Diana Garino, Renee Odders, Ye Olde Magic Shoppe, Raven Dark Moon, The Witches View Podcast,  Moma Sarah, Molly, Corvus, Catherine, AthenaBeth, Jen Rue of Rue & Hyssop, Shannon, Little Wren, Michael M., Jessica, Victoria, Johnathan, and Daniel (if we missed you this episode, we’ll make sure you’re in the next one!). Big thanks to everyone supporting us!

 

Play:

Download: Episode 104 – Yuletide Fear! 2016

Play:

 

 -Sources-

You may be interested in listening to our first Yuletide Cheer episode from 2014, where we discuss Krampus and other Christmas monsters (or if you’re a Patreon sponsor, you can check out our patrons-only episode on Krampus from last year as well).

The first ghost story was adapted from “The Toy Room,” collected in S.E. Schlosser’s Spooky Pennsylvania.

The second ghost story, “The Headless Hant,” is found in A Treasury of Southern Folklore, collected by B. A. Botkin.

You can find Al Ridenour at the Krampus Los Angeles website, and check out his excellent book The Krampus and the Old, Dark Christmas: Roots and Rebirth of the Folkloric Devil.

Check out our latest podcast effort, Chasing Foxfire, which just launched in early October. If you like folklore, this show will be connecting the dots between folk tales, science, nature, pop culture, literature, and more.

If you have feedback you’d like to share, email us or leave a comment. We’d love to hear from you!

Don’t forget to follow us at Twitter! And check out our Facebook page! For those who are interested, we also now have a page on Pinterest you might like, called “The Olde Broom.” Have something you want to say? Leave us a voice mail on our official NWW hotline: (442) 999-4824 (that’s 442-99-WITCH, if it helps).

 

 Promos & Music

Songs in this episode are “Shchedrik (Carol of the Bells)” and “Byla Cesta,” by Kitka, licensed from Magnatune. Incidental music is “Stillenacht,” by Ralph Rousseau Meulenbroeks; “What Child is This,” by Chad Lawson; and “Sedativa I,” by DR (all also licensed from Magnatune).

Episode 103 – Yuletide Cheer! 2016

December 21, 2016

NWWLogoUpdated2015small

Summary:

In our annual holiday episode, we listen to carols, share some holiday memories (and a few tears), and talk about how we welcome in the winter.

 

Please check out our Patreon page! You can help support the show for as little as a dollar a month, and get some awesome rewards at the same time.  Even if you can’t give, spread the word and let others know, and maybe we can make New World Witchery even better than it is now.

 

Producers for this show: Corvus, Diana Garino, Renee Odders, Ye Olde Magic Shoppe, Raven Dark Moon, The Witches View Podcast,  Moma Sarah, Molly, Corvus, Catherine, AthenaBeth, Jen Rue of Rue & Hyssop, Shannon, Little Wren, Michael M., Jessica, Victoria, Johnathan, and Daniel (if we missed you this episode, we’ll make sure you’re in the next one!). Big thanks to everyone supporting us!

 

Play:

Download: Episode 103 – Yuletide Cheer! 2016

Listen:

 

 -Sources-

See “Promos & Music” for a complete track listing.

Check out our latest podcast effort, Chasing Foxfire, which just launched in early October. If you like folklore, this show will be connecting the dots between folk tales, science, nature, pop culture, literature, and more.

If you have feedback you’d like to share, email us or leave a comment. We’d love to hear from you!

Don’t forget to follow us at Twitter! And check out our Facebook page! For those who are interested, we also now have a page on Pinterest you might like, called “The Olde Broom.” Have something you want to say? Leave us a voice mail on our official NWW hotline: (442) 999-4824 (that’s 442-99-WITCH, if it helps).

 

 Promos & Music

Playlist

-Introduction-

  • While Shepherds Watched their Flocks (The Angel of the Lord) – Alabama Sacred Harp Collection (LOC/Lomax Collection)
  • Bethlehem, Bethlehem – Kitka (Magnatune)
  • Soul Cake – Pagan Carolers (Archive.org)

-Carols of the Animals-

-Calling in the Winter-

  • Welcome Winter – Pagan Carolers (Archive.org)
  • Nou Is Yole Comen – Shira Kammen (Magnatune)
  • This Endris Night – Randall Stroope & the Oxford Choir (Soundcloud)
  • Solstice Night – S.J. Tucker (by artist permission)

-Feasting, Wassailing, and Merrymaking-

  • All and Some – Pagan Carolers (Archive.org)
  • Apple Tree Wassail – Shira Kammen (Magnatune)
  • The Glory of the Kitchen/Twelfth Eve – Passamezzo (Magnatune)
  • Beat Up the Drum – Passamezzo (Magnatune)

-Traditional Closing-

Incidental music is “The Blud-Red Rose at Yule,” by Music for a Winter’s Eve (Magnatune)

Episode 94 – The Wheel of the Year

May 27, 2016

Summary:

This time around (get it? Puns!) we look at the Neo-Pagan wheel of the year. We also discuss the importance of cycles in magical and spiritual practice, and we announce our latest contest winner.

Please check out our Patreon page! You can help support the show for as little as a dollar a month, and get some awesome rewards at the same time.  Even if you can’t give, spread the word and let others know, and maybe we can make New World Witchery even better than it is now.

Producers for this show: Corvus, Diana Garino, Renee Odders, Ye Olde Magic Shoppe, Raven Dark Moon, Ivory, The Witches View Podcast,  Sarah, Molly, Corvus, Catherine, AthenaBeth, Jen Rue of Rue & Hyssop, and Jessica (if we missed you this episode, we’ll make sure you’re in the next one!). Big thanks to everyone supporting us!

Play:

Download: Episode 94 – The Wheel of the Year

 

 -Sources-

For our “Looking Back” segment, we turned to Episode 44 – American Holidays for our inspiration. We’d also like to mention Jason Mankey’s article “The Eight Great American Sabbats,” which prompted that discussion originally and influenced this one somewhat.

Laine mentions she’ll be trying an upcoming WitchBox to see if it sparks her practice a bit.

You can read a lot about the history of the Neo-Pagan holidays in Margaret Atwood Margot Adler’s Drawing Down the Moon, Aidan Kelley’s A Tapestry of Witches, and Ronald Hutton’s Stations of the Sun.

We’ll be attempting a live broadcast via Periscope in late June, so stay tuned for details on that!

Also, we should be launching our newest podcast effort, Chasing Foxfire, in the next few months as well.

If you have feedback you’d like to share, email us or leave a comment. We’d love to hear from you!

Don’t forget to follow us at Twitter! And check out our Facebook page! For those who are interested, we also now have a page on Pinterest you might like, called “The Olde Broom.” Have something you want to say? Leave us a voice mail on our official NWW hotline: (442) 999-4824 (that’s 442-99-WITCH, if it helps).

 

 Promos & Music

Title and closing music is “Pig Ankle Rag,” by The Joy Drops, and is used under a Creative Commons License (available at Soundcloud.com).

Additional music is “Happy at the Wheel,” by The Twin Atlas, found at the Free Music Archive and used under a Creative Commons License.

Episode 92 – Sabbats and Esbats

April 22, 2016

NWWLogoUpdated2015small

Summary:

In this episode, we look at witch gatherings under full moons and around bonfires, from tales in folklore to what we do when we get together with other witches.

 

Please check out our Patreon page! You can help support the show for as little as a dollar a month, and get some awesome rewards at the same time.  Even if you can’t give, spread the word and let others know, and maybe we can make New World Witchery even better than it is now.

 

Producers for this show: Corvus, Diana Garino, Renee Odders, Ye Olde Magic Shoppe, Raven Dark Moon, Ivory, The Witches View Podcast,  Sarah, Molly, Corvus, Catherine, AthenaBeth, Jen Rue of Rue & Hyssop, and our newest Producer, Jessica (if we missed you this episode, we’ll make sure you’re in the next one!). Big thanks to everyone supporting us!

 

CONTEST ANNOUNCEMENT! It’s the last month to enter! We want to do a second round of our Audio Spellbook, so all you have to do is send us the sound of *you* describing your favorite spell which uses everyday ingredients (things you could find in a spice cabinet, grocery store, or backyard, for example). You can either record your spell and email it to us at compassandkey@gmail.com or call us and leave us a voice mail on our official NWW hotline: (442) 999-4824 (that’s 442-99-WITCH, if it helps).  You can also get an extra entry by sharing either our Patreon page or our Contest Announcement via your favorite social media (make sure to tag us or get a screen capture you can email to us). What will you be entered to get? Well, you’ll get a NWW Annual Mailer (who can’t use an extra one of those, right?), a couple of bottles of our personally handmade condition oils, a folk charm or two, and a book or two to make it all even better!

Play:

Download: Episode 92 – Sabbats and Esbats

 

 -Sources-

Our “Looking Back” segment is Episode 43 – Solitary, Partner, or Coven. You may also want to check out our Special Episode – The Horned Women, which features a fairy tale version of a witch gathering.

We’ve got several book and media sources we mention in this episode:

We discuss several different mail-order Sabbat kits. We haven’t ever used any of them, so these aren’t recommendations, but the ones we’ve looked at a little bit are:

You may also want to check out Sarah Lawless’ episode on Sabbats from her old show, Hedgefolk Tales, which has an account by Robert Cochrane on it.

If you have feedback you’d like to share, email us or leave a comment. We’d love to hear from you!

Don’t forget to follow us at Twitter! And check out our Facebook page! For those who are interested, we also now have a page on Pinterest you might like, called “The Olde Broom.”

 

 Promos & Music

Title and closing music is “Pig Ankle Rag,” by The Joy Drops, and is used under a Creative Commons License (available at Soundcloud.com).

Podcast 72 – Yuletide Cheer! 2014 (Part Three)

December 26, 2014

Podcast 72 – Yuletide Cheer! 2014 (Part Three)

Summary:
Our last holiday show is chock-full of new-old-fashioned-way music to put you in the holiday spirit. I keep the talking to a minimum this year and focus on Christmas carols, winter songs about birds, and of course, wassails!

Play:
Download: New World Witchery – Episode 72

-Sources-
See below for a complete track listing.

If you have feedback you’d like to share, email us or leave a comment. We’d love to hear from you!

Don’t forget to follow us at Twitter! And check out our Facebook page!

Promos & Music
The following songs are used through Creative Commons Licenses and distributed as podsafe media, or presented with the permission of the artist. Please see the distribution sites for additional information on the artists, their works, and how to purchase more of their music.

 

  1. A’Soalin – The Bird Sings/Lisa Goettel (Soundcloud)
  2. In the Bleak Midwinter – Richmondie (Soundcloud)
  3. All Hayle to the Days/Drive the Cold Winter Away – Harper’s Hamper (Magnatune)
  4. Fum Fum Fum – UnToupoutou/Army Men’s Chorale (Christmas Chorus, 2012 – Soundcloud)
  5. Nou is Yole Comen – Shira Kammen (In the Castle of the Holly King – Magnatune)
  6. Wren’s Carol – Shira Kammen (In the Castle of the Holly King – Magnatune)
  7. The Darkling Thrush – Brooms of Destruction (2012 – Soundcloud)
  8. Carol of the Birds – Broceliande (Magnatune)
  9. Children Go Where I Send Thee – The Bird Sings/Lisa Goettel (2013 – Soundcloud)
  10. Holy Night – Ronny Matthes (2012 – Jamendo)
  11. Hail Mary – UnToupoutou/Army Men’s Chorale (Christmas Chorus, 2012 – Soundcloud)
  12. Stille Nacht – Kat 330 (2013 – Soundcloud)
  13. Wassail Song – James Edwards (Christmas Bells, 2009 – Jamendo)
  14. Gower Wassail – Shira Kammen (Magnatune)
  15. Wassail Wassail – The Bird Sings/Lisa Goettel (2013 – Soundcloud)
  16. The Boar’s Head Carol – The Bird Sings/Lisa Goettel (2013 – Soundcloud)
  17. Coventry Carol – UnToupoutou/Army Men’s Chorale (Christmas Chorus, 2012 – Soundcloud)
  18. Deck the Halls – Harper’s Hamper (Magnatune)
  19. The First Noel – Tuba Chick (Composing and Arranging, 2011 – Soundcloud)
  20. Da Day Dawn – Samantha Gillogly (With Artist Permission)

 

Incidental music isMidden in de winternacht” by Ralph Rousseau (2009 – Jamendo).


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