Posted tagged ‘music’

Episode 81 – Magical Occupations Revisited

October 30, 2015

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Episode 81 – Magical Occupations Revisited

Summary:

We launch our super-exciting and fun Patreon campaign! Come support us and help us grow (and get cool stuff at the same time)! We also revisit one of the topics we enjoyed most in our early days, Magical Occupations, and add some ‘new’ jobs to the list, as well as some new folklore to explore.

 

Play:

Download: Episode 81 – Magical Occupations Revisited

 

-Sources-

We have to give a very special thanks to YOU! Our listeners! You sent in the emails and comments which we used to think about magical occupations a second time around, and added so much brilliant insight to the discussion. Thank you!

Other sources include:

For a look at the folklore in J. K. Rowling’s wizarding world, check out The Sorcerer’s Companion: A Guide to the Magical World of Harry Potter.

Some resources based on the various “new” jobs discussed:

 

  • Nurses: Barbara Brennan’s Hands of Light is a book which uses energy healing in a nursing context
  • Hairdressers: Carolyn Morrow Long’s bio of Marie Laveau, A Voudou Priestess, addresses some of the hairdressing lore.

Cory also enthusiastically recommends the film Gypsy 83.

Please, please, please, check out our new Patreon page! You can help support the show for as little as a dollar a month, and get some awesome rewards at the same time. Even if you can’t give, spread the word and let others know, and maybe we can make New World Witchery even better than it is now.

 

If you have feedback you’d like to share, email us or leave a comment. We’d love to hear from you!

Don’t forget to follow us at Twitter! And check out our Facebook page! For those who are interested, we also now have a page on Pinterest you might like, called “The Olde Broom.”

 

Promos & Music

Title music:  “Homebound,” by Jag, from Cypress Grove Blues.  From Magnatune.

Incidental music in this episode is selected from the emerging genre of Witchhouse. The band you hear samples from is Salem, from their free album “I Buried My Heart Inna Wounded Knee.”

Podcast recommendation: Dusted! A Buffy the Vampire Slayer Podcast (which both Cory & Laine have been listening to far too often)

Podcast 72 – Yuletide Cheer! 2014 (Part Three)

December 26, 2014

Podcast 72 – Yuletide Cheer! 2014 (Part Three)

Summary:
Our last holiday show is chock-full of new-old-fashioned-way music to put you in the holiday spirit. I keep the talking to a minimum this year and focus on Christmas carols, winter songs about birds, and of course, wassails!

Play:
Download: New World Witchery – Episode 72

-Sources-
See below for a complete track listing.

If you have feedback you’d like to share, email us or leave a comment. We’d love to hear from you!

Don’t forget to follow us at Twitter! And check out our Facebook page!

Promos & Music
The following songs are used through Creative Commons Licenses and distributed as podsafe media, or presented with the permission of the artist. Please see the distribution sites for additional information on the artists, their works, and how to purchase more of their music.

 

  1. A’Soalin – The Bird Sings/Lisa Goettel (Soundcloud)
  2. In the Bleak Midwinter – Richmondie (Soundcloud)
  3. All Hayle to the Days/Drive the Cold Winter Away – Harper’s Hamper (Magnatune)
  4. Fum Fum Fum – UnToupoutou/Army Men’s Chorale (Christmas Chorus, 2012 – Soundcloud)
  5. Nou is Yole Comen – Shira Kammen (In the Castle of the Holly King – Magnatune)
  6. Wren’s Carol – Shira Kammen (In the Castle of the Holly King – Magnatune)
  7. The Darkling Thrush – Brooms of Destruction (2012 – Soundcloud)
  8. Carol of the Birds – Broceliande (Magnatune)
  9. Children Go Where I Send Thee – The Bird Sings/Lisa Goettel (2013 – Soundcloud)
  10. Holy Night – Ronny Matthes (2012 – Jamendo)
  11. Hail Mary – UnToupoutou/Army Men’s Chorale (Christmas Chorus, 2012 – Soundcloud)
  12. Stille Nacht – Kat 330 (2013 – Soundcloud)
  13. Wassail Song – James Edwards (Christmas Bells, 2009 – Jamendo)
  14. Gower Wassail – Shira Kammen (Magnatune)
  15. Wassail Wassail – The Bird Sings/Lisa Goettel (2013 – Soundcloud)
  16. The Boar’s Head Carol – The Bird Sings/Lisa Goettel (2013 – Soundcloud)
  17. Coventry Carol – UnToupoutou/Army Men’s Chorale (Christmas Chorus, 2012 – Soundcloud)
  18. Deck the Halls – Harper’s Hamper (Magnatune)
  19. The First Noel – Tuba Chick (Composing and Arranging, 2011 – Soundcloud)
  20. Da Day Dawn – Samantha Gillogly (With Artist Permission)

 

Incidental music isMidden in de winternacht” by Ralph Rousseau (2009 – Jamendo).

Podcast 58 – Yuletide Cheer! 2013

December 15, 2013

-SHOWNOTES FOR EPISODE 58

Summary

Our annual fruitcake of wintery music, poetry, & other holiday goodies!

 Play:

Download: New World Witchery – Episode 58

-Sources-

Stories & Poetry:

  1. Noel,” by Katherine Porter
  2. “Christmas,” (two versions) and “Winter,” from The Real Mother Goose
  3. Christmas Trees,” by Robert Frost
  4. A selection from “The Snow Queen,” by Hans Christian Andersen
  5. Santa’s Traveling Companions,” adapted from information at the Saint Nicholas Center

Don’t forget to follow us at Twitter! And at Facebook!

Also, please enter our current contest!

Promos & Music

All songs used with permission/license, from Magnatune, SoundCloud, Creative Commons, and MusicAlley, except as noted.

Playlist:

  1. “Nou is Yole Comen,” Shira Kammen
  2. “Swete was the Song,” by Artsy Honker
  3. “Good King Wenceslas,” US Army Chorus
  4. “Candelight Carol,” Kathmandu Chorale
  5. “Lo How a Rose E’er Blooming,” Annie Hiller
  6. “Carol of the Birds,” by Broceliande*
  7. “The Holly, Witches Dance,” Harper’s Hamper
  8. “Broome, Bonny Broome,” Harper’s Hamper
  9. “Patapan,” Fugli
  10. “Cherry Tree Carol,” Rose & Thistle Band (independent artist)
  11. “This Endris Night,” US Army Chorus
  12. “Cold Blows the Wind,” Music for a Winter’s Eve
  13. “Deck the Halls,” Harper’s Hamper
  14. “Green Grows the Holly,” Shira Kammen
  15. “O Christmas Tree,” Tubachick
  16. “O Tannenbaum,” Kellianna (f. Jenna Greene)*
  17.  “Winter’s Ritual,” SJ Tucker (from Ember Days soundtrack)*
  18. “Wassail Song,” Music for a Winter’s Eve
  19. “Come Landlord fill the Flowing Bowl,” The Limeybirds (independent artist)
  20. “Boar’s Head Carol,” The Pagan Carolers
  21. “O Come Emmanuel,” Mary Ellen Kirk
  22. “Ave Maria,” Kellianna*
  23. “Da Day Dawn,” Samantha Gillogly*

*Used with artist permission

Underscoring music is “Nu Zit Wellekome,” Ralph Rousseau Meulenbroeks, and “Courdian,” Music for a Winter’s Eve, both from Magnatune.

Podcast Special – A Hearse of Verse

October 18, 2013

SHOWNOTES FOR PODCAST SPECIAL – A HEARSE OF VERSE

Summary
In this episode we have a selection of ghastly and witchy music and poetry.

Sources

Play
Special Episode – A Hearse of Verse

Music
Title & end music: “Grifos Muertos” by Jeffery Luck Lucas, from his album What We Whisper, on Magnatune.com

Playlist:

Blog Post 180 – New World Witchery Cartulary No. 4

August 20, 2013

Greetings and salutations! It has been a phenomenally busy end-of-summer around here. We’ve got a show in the works, and I’ve got articles brewing for the website, the Witches & Pagans site, and several print publications as well, so keep an eye out for those. Today I thought it would be good to have a brief cartulary post, though, so that while you’re waiting on tenterhooks for more New World Witchery (and you are waiting on those tenterhooks, aren’t you?), you won’t get too bored.

First of all, it’s the birthday of Howard Phillips Lovecraft, the noted author of some of the best weird and horror fiction of the twentieth century. If you’ve ever heard of Cthulhu or the Necronomicon, those are Lovecraft’s brainchildren, as are so many modern horror elements. What makes him of interest here is that he blends the occult with the scientific, creating a strange but wonderful mythology that is very easy to get sucked into. Much of his work has entered the public domain, and you can frequently find good collections of it cheaply, such as this Kindle collection of his work for less than a dollar. If you want to spend a little more, pick up the truly excellent Library of America collection, which also contains a chronology of Lovecraft’s life and a thorough annotation to the stories. If you’re a podcast listener, you should also definitely check out the HP Lovecraft Literary Podcast, who record dramatized versions of the author’s eerie tales.

I recently reviewed a couple of books on conjure, both of which fall into the non-fiction camp, but since we’re talking about weird tales, I think a few recommendations of conjure fiction would be worthwhile. First, I have to recommend the collection Mojo: Conjure Stories, edited by the wonderful Nalo Hopkinson. I’ve reviewed this book before, so I won’t say more than it is definitely worth a read. Fire Lyte sent me a wonderful collection of late 19th and early 20th century conjure tales called Voodoo: Strange & Fascinating Tales & Lore, edited by John Richard Stephens. The editor unfortunately bowdlerized a number of the stories, but you can find a number of great tales in here anyway, by authors like H.G. Wells and Charles Chesnutt. If you’re looking for a great collection of hoodoo stories just by Chesnutt, I received the marvelous Norton Critical Edition of his Conjure Stories back at Christmas, and it definitely rewards a reader with an interest in folkways , magic, and good literary storytelling.

I can’t recall if I mentioned it or not, but I recently watched a few classic “voodoo” films via Netflix and/or Amazon Instant that may be of interest to folks here. The classic White Zombie stars Bela Lugosi and features all sorts of ridiculous fun. The 1988 film The Serpent and the Rainbow was more enjoyable than I thought it would be at first. It’s based on a book of the same name by anthropologist Wade Davis, who theorized that the “zombie powders” of Vodoun might be a form of bufotoxin or tetradotoxin found in poisonous animals which induced corpse-like comas in victims. The movie obviously mangles the research a bit in the name of good storytelling (well, storytelling of some kind, anyway), but it still makes for a harrowing look at the political and spiritual life of Haiti under the dictatorship of Papa Doc and Baby Doc Duvalier.

Finally, I wanted to mention a few musical items of interest. Firstly, I picked up a really fun compilation CD put out by the Lucky Mojo Company called cat yronwode’s Hoodoo Jukebox. It’s part of a 2-CD set which includes a CD-ROM full of hoodoo-related graphics (mostly in the Lucky Mojo style). The music CD is basically a collection of old country or backwoods blues tunes by the likes of the Memphis Jug Band, Johnnie Temple, and Blind Willie McTell. It’s essentially all tunes coming from public domain sources, so I’m not sure if any of the proceeds go to the artists’ families, but I imagine with Yronwode’s usually ardent position on intellectual property and copyrights she’s found some way to do good things with the funds. Most of these songs you could find by digging around in archives or on the internet long enough, but Cat has done a marvelous job assembling them in one place and providing a really rich commentary on them in the liner notes. If you like blues or even just music about magical things (and I’m looking at you and your upcoming Halloween episode, Velma Nightshade), this is a good collection to have.

I also cannot help but shamelessly plug a friend of mine’s latest release. If you’ve not heard of Amanda Shires, you probably will, and soon. Her new CD, Down Fell the Doves, is the deeply haunting sort of alt-country record I can’t resist. It’s relevant here because several of the tracks have deeply folkloric elements. “Bulletproof” talks about animal curios given to Shires by a man named “Tiger Bill” with the assurance “That’ll make you bulletproof.” The song “Deep Dark Below” speaks of a devil who plays a fiddle with a bow made of bone that “sounds like your deepest desires.” If you like good, spooky music touched by rock, blues, country, and folk influences (somewhat similar to the marvelous band Devil Makes Three, which Sarah Lawless introduced me to), give Down Fell the Doves a listen.

Thanks for reading!

-Cory

Podcast 22 – Yuletide Cheer!

December 21, 2010

Summary

Happy Yule!  Today we have our favorite carols, poems, recipes, and even a little lore for the winter holidays.  Have a blessed and happy holiday season!

Play:


Download:  New World Witchery – Episode 22

-Sources-
A Visit from St. Nicholas,” attributed to Clement Clark Moore, but likely written by Henry Livingston, Jr.
The Oxen,” by Thomas Hardy.

Recipes for Tom & Jerrys, Reindeer Food, and Gingerbread cookies.

Holiday animal lore can be found here.

Promos & Music
Nearly every song can be found on CDBaby.com or iTunes.  Below I’ve attempted to link directly to the artist pages where possible.

  1. I Saw Three Ships – West of Eden
  2. Gods Rest Ye Merry Paganfolk – The Pagan Carolers
  3. Hark the Herald Angels Sing – Doug Smith
  4. Wren in the Furze – Shira Kammen
  5. Silver Bells – Steve Martin & Paul Simon (Live recording from SNL)
  6. A Soalin’/Soul Cake – Pagan Carolers
  7. Holly & The Ivy – Howl-O
  8. Good King Wenceslas – The Trail Band
  9. Cherry Tree Carol – Rose & Thistle Band
  10. Bring the Torch Jeanette Isabella – Trifolkal
  11. Boars Head Carol – Pagan Carolers
  12. Come Landlord Fill the Flowing Bowl – The Limeybirds
  13. Gloucester Wassail – Pagan Carolers
  14. Carol of the Bells – Ross Moore
  15. Stille Nacht/Silent Night – Katie McMahon
  16. Snowbird – Maidens Three
  17. Da Day Dawn – Samantha Gillogly
  18. O Tannenbaum – Antique Music Box Christmas Collection
  19. O Holy Night – Indigo Girls
  20. This Endris Night – Heather Dale
  21. Go Tell It On the Mountain – Easy Anthems
  22. Patapan – Bittersweet & Briers
  23. Welcome Yule – Renaissance Revelers
  24. Little Drummer Boy – Men of Worth
  25. Angels We Have Heard on High – Skye Pixton
  26. Auld Lang Syne – Marc Gunn

Holiday wishes from (in no particular order) Saturn Darkhope, Oraia Sphinx, Scarlet at LPV, Gillian the Iron Powaqa, Rianna Stone the Pagan Homesteader, & Kathleen at Borealis Meditation.

Blog Post 86 – StrowlerFest

September 2, 2010

Those of you who’ve listened to Podcast 14 already know about this, but over the coming months there will be a series of concerts/events taking place across the nation called Strowlers.  These are part musical concert, part sideshow, part pagan festival, and sound like they will be all fun!  What are Strowlers, you might ask?  According to the Dictionary of Theiving Slang, 1737 cited on the event website, they are:

“n. Vagabonds, Itinerants, Men of no settled Abode, of a precarious Life, Wanderers of Fortune, such as Gypsies, Beggars, Pedlars, Hawkers, Mountebanks, Fidlers, Country-Players, Rope-dancers, Jugglers, Tumblers, Shewers of Tricks, and Raree-show-men.”

There’s a whole fictionalized back story associated with the event in which America never won the Revolutionary War and thus is still subject to the whims of the English king, but I’ll leave the storytelling to the professionals.  You can read more about it here.

The series of festivals is sponsored in part by bestselling author Laurell K. Hamilton and folk-rocker SJ Tucker.  The actual events will contain performances by a variety of artists, writers, and performers, including:

  • Musical performances from SJ Tucker, Tricky Pixie, Gypsy Nomads, Wendy Rule, Heather Dale, Traveling Fates, Sharon Knight, Alexander James Adams, and more!
  • Workshops on Astrology, Poi Dancing, Juggling, Arthurian Bardic Singing, Aromatherapy, and other topics, too!
  • A History of Fencing (with just a touch of magic)
  • A Maker showcase featuring “inventors and tinkerers and artists that work in physical, touchable media, as well as traditional art media”

Strowler events will take place in:

These events sound like a great time, and offer a good bit more than a standard Pagan festival in terms of diversion and community.  If you’ve listened to our most recent podcast, you know that we’ve got a special promotion going on that will get you 10% off tickets when you use our passcode.  If you can’t listen to the podcast for some reason, simply email us with the subject line “Strowlers” and we’ll supply you with the discount code that way.

Please do go and see these events if you’re anywhere near them!  They are going to be a lot of fun, I know, plus you’ll be supporting the Pagan entertainment community.

Thanks for reading!

-Cory


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