Blog Post 02 – Book Review

Cory review’s Chas S. Clifton’s Her Hidden Children: The Rise of Wicca & Paganism in America.

Her Hidden Children, by Chas S. Clifton

I’ve just finished reading Chas S. Clifton’s Her Hidden Children:  The Rise of Wicca & Paganism in America this morning, and I thought that as his topics and my own intersect somewhat I might offer my take on his work.  First of all, I only recently learned who Mr. Clifton was through another podcast, T. Thorne Coyle’s Elemental Castings.  She was part of a panel discussion at the Florida Pagan Gathering in 2009, and Mr. Clifton was on that panel as well (other guests included Gavin and Yvonne Frost and Margot Adler).  The entire discussion can be heard at Ms. Coyle’s website, here.  What convinced me to read Clifton’s book was that in the panel, he spoke as an academic, but also a participant, and he did both with great skill.

After reading his book, I am inclined to think that his personality on the podcast is very much the same personality he puts forth in his writing—albeit a bit homier and less formal when he is speaking than writing.  He manages to provide a good, simple survey of the modern Pagan and Neo-Pagan movement in America, without resorting to overbold brush-strokes when he does so.  He doesn’t take the Gardnerian history at purely face value, but he also doesn’t simply dismiss it out of hand.  Rather, he takes the scholarly approach of examining the texts available and presenting the most reasonable conclusions he can based on those texts (or in some cases, media or personal correspondences).  Like Ronald Hutton’s Triumph of the Moon (which I feel Clifton’s book is greatly informed by), this book is not trying to make any fanciful claims about Paganism’s place in America (he makes the point repeatedly that there’s not a census of religion in America which can present a reliable number of “earth-based religious practitioners” in the US—he instead cites an independent survey which ranges from the upper hundreds of thousands to the low millions).  His examination of the various branches of Paganism in America is particularly noteworthy, as he gives short histories of each segment sourced not only from the branches themselves but from external documentation as well.

I enjoyed learning about the various areas of American Paganism with which I was only marginally familiar:  Feraferia and the Church of All Worlds (CAW), for example.  I also learned a lot about branches I was completely ignorant of, such as the Church of Aphrodite (the first Pagan religious group recognized in America) and the Psychedelic Venus Church.  Some of the better information in the book is about the interaction between various groups which may not always have been apparent.  The Church of Aphrodite, for example, had a great deal of influence on Feraferia because of a shared member, and the influence of Robert Heinlein’s Stranger in a Strange Land on not only the CAW, but groups like the Psychedelic Venus Church.

The book did leave me a little disappointed in some areas:  Clifton relies heavily on certain sources, such as Margot Adler, and on some information which is not particularly accessible (such as the aforementioned personal correspondences).  The largest drawback is that the work really only looks at the mid-to-late twentieth century in America with any great detail, other than to draw a few parallels between Transcendentalism and the modern Neo-Pagan movement.  I would have been greatly interested in finding out what influence movements like Spiritualism and Theosophy had on the Occult revival in America, and what effect in turn that revival had on Wicca and Paganism later on.  But I can also understand that the point of this book may not have been to dig back so far.  The bibliography and footnotes alone make the book worth purchasing or borrowing from the library, and the work certainly doesn’t disappoint in its stated purpose of chronicling the rise of modern Paganism in America.

In the end, while I wanted more, perhaps that is the best recommendation I can give.  This book is great for whetting an appetite for more information on American witchcraft and Paganism, and it certainly can provide a springboard into other areas of discovery.

-Cory

Podcast 1 – Introduction

-SHOWNOTES FOR EPISODE 1-

Summary

For Episode 1 of New World Witchery, Cory and Laine try to come up with a quick and simple definition for New World Witchery, including a brief overview of the traditions we consider to be under the umbrella of American Witchcraft.

We talk a bit about ourselves, our path to witchcraft, and how it has brought us to where we are today. And later on, Cory will give you a little bit of history on witchcraft in America.

Play:

Download:  New World Witchery – Episode 01

-Sources-

Websites

An extensive and very interesting list of witchcraft trials in America can be found at: http://www.personal.utulsa.edu/~Marc-Carlson/witchtrial/na.html.  This site also does the reader a service by providing direction to original source material and making it clear when details are too vague to make definitive statements about the trial.

Two websites which reveal a great deal about Hispanic magical practices are the Curious Curandera and Brujo Negro.   While they may seem diametrically opposed in some ways, they actually have quite a lot in common, and a good overview of Hispanic magical traditions can be worked out between the two.

Lilith’s Lantern, a site dedicated to the Feri  & Vicia branches of Anderson’s witchcraft, is a wonderful resource for learning more about this tradition.

Books

Narratives of the witchcraft cases, 1648-1706, ed. by George Lincoln Burr.  Dover, 2002.

Signs, Cures, & Witchery, by Gerald C. Milnes.  University of Tennessee Press, Knoxville, 2007.

Her Hidden Children, by Chas S. Clifton.  AltaMira Press, 2006.

Promos & Music

Title music:  “Homebound,” by Jag, from Cypress Grove Blues.  From Magnatune.

Promo 1-The Irish & Celtic Music Podcast

Promo 2-The iPod Witch

Promo 3-Witchery of One

Blog Post 01 – Introductions

A general introduction to the blog and podcast, plus a brief outline of New World Witchery.

Hello!

Welcome to New World Witchery, the Search for American Traditional Witchcraft.  This is a show/blog about magic, specifically the magic practiced in North America.   Your hosts are Cory & Laine, practicing witches who work with several New World systems.  If you like magic, particularly American folk magic, this is the show for you.

What is this Podcast/Blog About?

This project is—hopefully—going to help all of those magical practitioners out there who identify with their New World roots make sense of magic as it happens on the American landscape.

Some of the magical praxes we’ll be covering include (but are not limited to):

  • Hoodoo/rootwork
  • Pow-wow (PA Dutch Magic)
  • New Orleans-style Vodou
  • Appalachian Granny Magic
  • Ozark Mountain Magic
  • Brujeria/Curanderismo
  • Victor Anderson’s Feri Tradition/Vicia
  • New England Witchery

In addition, we’ll be having discussions about things like:

  • Effective spell crafting
  • Spell crafting successes and failures
  • Magic for oneself and magic for others
  • Magical terminology
  • Hexing
  • Being in or out of the “broom closet”

This show will be semi-monthly, with (hopefully) one podcast early in the month and one closer to the end of the month.  One podcast will be our regular discussion & banter, plus a segment on lore, history, and/or practice of New World Witchery.  The second podcast will have more discussion & banter, then an interview segment with a notable witch, scholar, or expert on some aspect of American traditional witchcraft.

We’ll also be trying out segments from time to time which we think might enhance the show.  Some of the ideas we’re kicking around are a handicrafts segment, poetry or stories related to American witchcraft, book recommendations, and highlights on magical ingredients and tools.  If you have a suggestion for one of these short segments, please contact us.  We’d love to hear from you!

The blog will be updated more frequently than the podcast, probably once or twice per week.  It will have show notes, short essays, links, and various odds and ends that we think might be worth a look. Again, suggestions are welcome.