Blog Post 191 – Book Review: The Voodoo Doll Spellbook, by Denise Alvarado

[Author’s disclaimer: I received this book as a review copy from Red Wheel/Weiser Books. They have neither paid nor coerced me in any way to write this review, and the opinions stated herein are my own, and do not reflect the position of the publisher.]

 

I am absolutely certain that a number of people will see the title of Denise Alvarado’s latest title from Red Wheel/Weiser Books and simply ignore its existence. That is a downright shame, because the book proves to be a personal and anthropological tour through an area of magic that can be very easy to misunderstand, work with dolls and effigies. Alvarado confronts the issue of the ‘Voodoo doll’ early in her text, laying its negative cultural cache at the feet of “Hollywood and the media” and noting that despite its origins as a “fusion of folk-lore with science fiction…the image of the pin-stuck doll is so embedded in the collective psyche of the general public that the thought of using a Voodoo doll any differently seems to defy all logic” (p. 2). Alvarado’s book is a repository of doll magic, some of it very interesting and useful, some merely edifying or even occasionally confusing, but it certainly deserves consideration beyond its titular associations.

The book is broken up into twenty-one chapters, generally grouping spells by expected outcome, not much different than other spellbooks in the genre, really. There are chapters on “Money Spells,” “Spells for Good Luck, Success, & Gambling,” and of course, “Spells for Love & Romance.” Alvarado really sets herself apart with the amount of space she devotes to the less savory workings of doll magic, with chapters like “Bend-Over Spells,” “Binding Spells,” “Break Up Spells,” and most especially an extensive chapter on “Curses, Hexes & Spells for Revenge.” Her work draws upon myriad traditions, not solely Vodoun, hoodoo, or Southern Conjure—the fields she clearly connects with best, at least personally. She also brings in chapters on doll magic from the Ancient world, such as dream dolls drawn from Greco-Egyptian magical papyri. One of the truly standout chapters is a section called “Japanese Voodoo Spells,” which actually looks at two types of effigy magic found in Japanese practice, even connecting them to the popular youth culture there: “Aggressive marketing campaigns advertising Ushi no Koku Mairi [Japanese cursing dolls] kits that contain a straw doll, a hammer, a couple of candles, and fifteen-centimeter-long nails are targeted to the young Japanese demographic” and she notes an increasing presence of these dolls in “anime episodes, online games, and videos that promote cyber cursing” on sites like YouTube (p. 172). Alvarado brings in Goetic spells involving dolls, and influences from Christian magical practice via Catholic and Psalm workings. She even includes a doll spell to prevent pets from getting lost.

Sources for The Voodoo Doll Spellbook range from the scholarly to the questionable (ghost hunting websites and a book on Mexican magic which tenuously reframes Hispanic folk ceremonies in a Wiccan context, for example), but generally speaking, Alvarado speaks authoritatively and presents her material well. Several spells are guest-contributed by conjure worker Carolina Dean, which prove to be some of the high points in the text. In some cases, the reason for lumping some spells into separate chapters is unclear, as in the “Binding Spells” section, of which a reprint of Psalm 94 takes up a full twenty percent of the pages. Still, when she is on-target, as with her two Mississippi cursing dolls (pp. 36-38), the quality of the work is apparent, and the spells make a useful compendium of doll magic.

The relatively few other doll-baby work books available (Starr Casas’ slim-but-potent one comes to mind, which seems to be out of print, sadly) mean that Alvarado’s book fills a major niche in practical magical writing. In many ways, what she accomplishes with The Voodoo Doll Spellbook is quite similar to work done by Judika Illes in her books—this is the notebook of a collector of spells. What plagues the text the most is its title, which seems to relegate it to a very specific subcategory of magical work, and which undermines its authority in the minds of educated readers. The material contained within is useful, if occasionally uneven (I’m currently working with one of her money doll spells, for example—I’ll let you know how that goes). While I could consider this book neither a definitive text nor a weak entry in the field, I can certainly point to its utility and some of its unusual offerings as a recommendation to read it and be satisfied.

If you’ve read this book, or have others to recommend on the topic of doll magic, I’d love to hear them!

Thanks for reading!

-Cory

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2 Comments on “Blog Post 191 – Book Review: The Voodoo Doll Spellbook, by Denise Alvarado”

  1. Lisa Schumacher Says:

    Denise Alvarado has a bad reputation on the internet,she is accused of being a fraud and plagiarism,I suggest that you look into the matter yourself and thus draw your own conclusions,I found this out when I went to the amazon site to find out more about the books ratings,the lowest ratings have horrible things to say about her,all I know is there are many complaints about her on amazon as well as the web,who knows if the complaints are true or not,but I suggest that you look into it,Sincerly,Lisa

    Date: Tue, 30 Sep 2014 16:34:36 +0000 To: i_lovecats2010@hotmail.com


    • Hi Lisa,
      I’m very much aware of the internet rumor-mill surrounding Alvarado (she has also been a guest on the show before). I am always surprised to see how vehemently people pursue her while leaving others who do similar work untouched, but I have noticed that people like Alvarado and Cat Yronwode seem to be taking more and more direct or indirect heat lately. I’d prefer to stay out of the business of rumor-mongering, so I review this work based on the content of the text rather than any ad hominem attacks against the author. It does seem to be sourced fairly thoroughly (even if I don’t always love the sources), so perhaps this book would be worth investigating, even for Ms. Alvarado’s detractors.

      I do hope that people like Alvardo, Illes, and Yronwode, who have been acting as collectors of folk magical material for years now will continue to put out their collections, as I find them extremely valuable, even if I don’t always trust everything at face value that I find in the texts. Hopefully, our readers and I will remain open-minded but critical of any new information that appears on the folk magic scene.

      Thanks for writing in and looking out for us!
      -Cory


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