Podcast 7 – Weather Magic and Lore

-SHOWNOTES FOR EPISODE 7-

Summary
Today we’ll look at some weather folklore and magic.  Then, we’ll be introducing two new sections:  WitchCraft with Laine, and Magic Spelled Out with Cory.

Play:

Download:  New World Witchery – Episode 7

-Sources-
Main Topic
The Foxfire BookSpecifically the chapter on weather lore
Smoky Mountain Weather Lore – With some interesting weather folklore from the Appalachians
Buying the Wind by Richard Dorson
Grimoire for the Green Witch, by Ann Moura
Dog Predicting Earthquake – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1MFzcl-kZHo&feature=related
And of course, weather lore provided by our wonderful listeners!

WitchCraft
“Knitting Witchcraft” by Olivia O’Meir, in Llewellyn’s 2007 Magical Almanac
The Knitter’s Book of Yarn, by Clara Parkes
knittingdaily.com
theanticraft.com
ravelry.com

Magic Spelled Out
Earth Power, by Scott Cunningham
Encyclopedia of 5000 Spells, by Judika Iles

Promos & Music
Title music:  “Homebound,” by Jag, from Cypress Grove Blues.  From Magnatune.
WitchCraft Intro: “Down on the Farm” by Chubby Parker
Magic Spelled Out Intro: “Evil Devil Woman Blues” by Joe McCoy
Promo 1 – Witchery of One (Hooray!  Jay’s back!)
Promo 2- Pennies in the Well

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18 Comments on “Podcast 7 – Weather Magic and Lore”

  1. gardener21 Says:

    Great show!
    One tidbit about plants and their “knowing” — plants do communicate with each other by means of chemical secretions.

    example of this: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/06/090619171244.htm

    So, it’s possible that plants “tell” each other about upcoming weather/seasons and then adapt accordingly. Cool!

  2. Pombagira Says:

    Sheep, Wool and folds, *takes breath*

    ok, mulesing which is essentially the cutting away of the skin from about the back side of the sheep and something that is mostly practised in australia, and here in new zealand where i am from it is not practised so much. how i see it is that would be because of laziness of the farmers. (those that mules Lazy those that don’t not Lazy) it is a barbaric practice which causes the sheep quite a bit of pain and suffering and anaesthetics are not used. not so nice actually especially given that there are other and better methods of preventing fly strike. in new zealand what happened in stead is crutching, which is when the sheep is shawm around the crutching area. and i am wondering if we have a different strain of that particulate type of sheep.. but then it could also be down to environment and weather, etc etc.. and of course kiwi farmers.. not lazy… *nods*

    now as an extra bonus information, these folds from around some breeds of sheep were bread into the sheep by us, or sheep farmers with the idea that they would produce more wool. (some sheep breeds are quite wrinkley) how ever these wrinkly sheep did not produced the extra amount of sheep, instead it caused the aforementioned fly strike.

    so now they are breeding sheep to have no wrinkles and no wrinkles around their buttocks thus less muck and less fly strike. … and no need to cutting away folds of skin on hapless sheep.

    for more museling information and other fun stuff.. (although it is quite one sided information) go here http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mulesing

    i still enjoyed your show, and liked the new segments *smiles*..

    *twirls around*
    Polly


    • Hi Polly!

      Thanks for the extra information! Honestly, I’d never even heard of the practice until Laine brought it up, and I raised sheep for the better part of my adolescence. It sounds like it must be a breed issue (like you said), because our sheep didn’t have that issue or those folds. We did have to dock tails when the sheep were young in order to prevent some problems, but I think that was about the worst of it.

      At any rate, I’m glad you liked the show! Feel free to drop a comment anytime 🙂 Thanks for listening!

      -Cory

      • Pombagira Says:

        yeah, the Merino, by the looks of it is the predominant sheep breed that they do it to. most farmers in NZ have been breeding the winkles out of the Merino for years some by crossing them with non wrinkly sheep and others by selective breeding.. depending on what the sheep were in the first place.. not that i complete understand it cause its all science.. but hey the lambs are cute..and tastey.. *noms*

        docking tails way less painful for the sheep.. besides you have to admit that man has been selectivity breeding sheep for quite some time now and tails are not so important, the tails have not been breed or use.. so to speak.. thus we dock them. also.. lambs tails.. not so nom.. *bluergeh*…

        *beams*

  3. Oraia Sphinx Says:

    Awesome episode, guys! Great weather lore, plus I love both of the new segments. Now I want to get out my knitting needles and yarn, but I’m torn between knitting something and tying knots in it. 😉


    • Haha, thanks Oraia! I’m glad you liked the new bits. Hopefully I’ll be able to polish mine up a bit in the future, but overall I’m excited about these new sections.

      Can’t wait for your next episode, by the way! Even though I know it comes out on the 21st, I always check your stream on iTunes just in case, lol.

      -Cory

      • Oraia Sphinx Says:

        Aw, now I feel all warm and fuzzy inside. 🙂 I’ve actually been blogging on a weekly basis, to have something out there in between episodes. It’s not always on the same sorts of things I put in the show, but hopefully it’s interesting.

  4. Holly Says:

    It’s another great episode! I’ve been really enjoying your podcasts. Cory and Laine, you have fantastic chemistry; it’s been thoroughly entertaining & informative. Looking forward to the next one!


    • Awww, thanks Holly! I’m glad you like the show! Hopefully we’ll be able to keep up the good vibe. If you have any suggestions for topics you’d like to see discussed, we’d love to hear them!

      All the best!

      -Cory

  5. Chet Says:

    Hey guys, FYI, I tried to download the show and it is giving me a 404 file not found error on the link. It looks like the stream is working ok though, just wanted to give you a heads up :>)


    • Hi Chet! Thanks for the head’s up! How were you trying to download the show? I’m seeing it come through on iTunes and using a right-click download method, but I know there are lots of ways to download, so I want to make sure we fix any problems asap 🙂

      Thanks again!

      -Cory

      • Chet Says:

        Hi Cory…I am trying to download right from this page, where is says “Download: New World Witchery – Episode 7”.

        I get a HTM of the link on a right click, or the 404 if I just click it.


      • Hmmm…very odd. Is anyone else having this problem? (asking generally to anyone reading this comment).

      • Chet Says:

        Cory, update..I’m still not able to right click, but was able to click, have it open in another window, and then I was able to save it down. Could just be my box acting funky, but usually i have no probs right clicking and saving.

        Eitherway, looking forward to listening!

  6. Juniper Says:

    Great podcast guys. I’m am suggesting it to my Witch and Stitch Circle 🙂

  7. Saturn Says:

    Ahhh, yarnies. What else can be said about them but that they are a unique breed unto themselves? Laine, it was a great segment! You did give me flashbacks to being around other yarnies, though. But I can’t say much, being a stoner girl myself (yes, as in rocks). A friend of mine used to run a local bookstore called Grimoire’s Books where she ran a weekly yarnies group and one sort of magical item that came out of her store and I think a pattern she found on ravelry were Khuthulukins. Little crotched versions of the big green guy himself. Just in case anyone thought knitting was purely a safe passtime and good for only beneficent magic, if the knitter can make a vessel for khuthulu, it can’t be all that safe (not to mention that’s how Michael was fought off at one point in the first Halloween, with knitting needles).

    Cory, enjoyed your segment, too! lol, I still have several Cunningham books, and I still recommend solitary practitioner to noobs (i like the focus on personal energy and nature, you can’t hurt yourself or others or at least not easily with his book). The first time I read Earth, Air, Fire, Water I could feel the energy rising up around and inside of me, it was remarkable. Anyway, like the idea of the segment, too, as it ties back to your last interview and the importance of understanding the theory that underlies any magical practice, for once you truly comprehend that theory, you can move beyond someone who follows a recipe and actually start cooking.

    And thank you for playing my promo! Soooo weird to hear my voice on someone else’s podcast. That’s great, thank you. You guys rock.


    • Awwwwww, thanks gals! I know Laine will be happy to hear that her segment makes the stitchy witches twitch with happiness, lol. Hopefully we’ll have lots more fun segments in the future!

      -Cory

  8. Lynn Says:

    Hey Cory,
    Tell Laine I’m on Ravelry myself! Love the show!! I’m so happy and laughing when I listen to your show Keep up the great work, you all are Great!!


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